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Need Some Power for Your Presentation? A Quick Lesson From MLK Jr

On Martin Luther King Jr. day, I always reflect a bit on King's "I have a dream" speech and how that speech left its mark on our nation. I feel a little guilt because I don't want my passion for a good speech to eclipse King's continuing call to our nation. That said, have you ever thought about the power behind King's "I have a dream speech"?


King inspired a mixed audience of 200,000 when he gave this speech in Washington in 1963, and today people recognize the refrain and connect it with his name. Not many remember the details of the speech, but almost every American, from school child to senior citizen, can connect "I have a dream" with the inspiration of Martin Luther King, Jr.


King knew his listeners wanted to believe in the hope of justice, but the obstacles were daunting. History had been ugly on this point. Yet, King knew he spoke to people with deep convictions; he made a connection between his cause and the deep dreams of his audience for themselves, their children, and their nation.


Martin Luther King Jr. wove a golden thread of America's promise and the dream of freedom for all. In the center of the speech, he repeated a golden refrain, "I have a dream...," finishing the statement each time with concrete images of racial equality and harmony.


In a song, it's the refrain that connects the different verses together, the refrain that sticks in our heads. In King's speech, it's the refrain, "I have a dream" that rings with passion in our nation even today. We remember it, and it still has power to move us. This is one part of King's legacy.


I am well aware that his example of a outstanding orator not the most important gift King gave to our nation. Even so, as someone who is passionate about communication, I can't help but appreciate this gift.


Chances are that your next business presentation won't be about something as important as racial justice. Even so, you could make your point with concrete images that connect to the priorities of your audience. You could create a refrain that rings in their ears as they leave the room. Your speech, while it might not change a nation, could be memorable. It could make a difference in your sphere of the world. That's worth some effort. What is your refrain?


Want to avoid stupid mistakes that sabotage your speeches? Go to http://www.incrediblemessages.com/products.htm#howtowin Bonnie Budzowski works with organizations who want their sales associates have the top notch skills they need to build business messages that move the sale forward. She is a professional speaker, seminar leader and author. Contact her at http://www.inCredibleMessages.com


Source: www.a1articles.com